Kissing Is Not A Universal Sexual And Romantic Behavior Across Cultures

Many sexuality researchers and educators have claimed that kissing is a
universal or near universal sexual and romantic behavior. For example,
several sexuality textbooks explicitly say that kissing isn’t just popular
in the U.S. and other Western countries, but “it is also very common in
most other societies” [1]. These claims make sense in light of research
suggesting that kissing has evolutionary significance. For instance, some
researchers have suggested that kissing could be adaptive to the extent
that it promotes an exchange of healthy bacteria. At the same time, others
have claimed that kissing might play an important role when it comes to
mate choice.

However, if we truly want to make claims about the universality of kissing,
we really need a large cross-cultural study to explore whether kissing
actually occurs in different cultures and societies. A recent study
published in the American Anthropologist does precisely this, and the
results suggest that kissing may not be the universal behavior it has been
previously assumed to be [2].

Kissing Is Not A Universal Sexual And Romantic Behavior Across Cultures

Many sexuality researchers and educators have claimed that kissing is a
universal or near universal sexual and romantic behavior. For example,
several sexuality textbooks explicitly say that kissing isn’t just popular
in the U.S. and other Western countries, but “it is also very common in
most other societies” [1]. These claims make sense in light of research
suggesting that kissing has evolutionary significance. For instance, some
researchers have suggested that kissing could be adaptive to the extent
that it promotes an exchange of healthy bacteria. At the same time, others
have claimed that kissing might play an important role when it comes to
mate choice.

However, if we truly want to make claims about the universality of kissing,
we really need a large cross-cultural study to explore whether kissing
actually occurs in different cultures and societies. A recent study
published in the American Anthropologist does precisely this, and the
results suggest that kissing may not be the universal behavior it has been
previously assumed to be [2].

Sexual Orientation and Mental Health: Are Bisexuals at Greater Risk for Depression and Anxiety?

Psychologists have long known that gays and lesbians have an elevated risk
of depression and anxiety compared to heterosexual individuals. This health
disparity is thought to be due in large part to the chronic, high levels of
stress faced by sexual minorities due to their stigmatized social status.

But what about bisexual persons? Do they face similar mental health
disparities? Are they perhaps even worse off due to the fact that bisexuals
often face prejudice from both the gay and heterosexual communities?
Unfortunately, most research on the mental health of sexual minorities has
lumped bisexuals together with gays and lesbians, making it difficult to
determine exactly how bisexual individuals stack up relative to other
groups. However, a new review paper published in the Journal of Sex
Research offers some insight.